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20121202
20121210
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between national security and education. speakers included former secretary of state condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public-school, joel klein, hosted by the foundation for excellence and education. this is about an hour. >> welcome to this evening's bought test of morning joe. [laughter] the energy in this room is nice. how this issue of educational reform has ripened, the combination of need, the talent we see in this room. there is a sense that the moment has a ride. the other is jeb bush. i am a great believer that two things matter in life -- ideas and people. that is the driver of change in history. jeb is a perfect example of in what he is doing. he is the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. the fact that you are here is the greatest salute you could give. condie and that, the the national security background. we used to mess around with something called the rand bond calculated. it used to calculate the cep, t he circular error robert roe -- error probable. are today. we have travelled a considerable distance. when asked what the gre
education and retirement. >> on the tax side, as part of the adults of a solution, to you think the gap between the way work is tax and investment and capital gains are taxed -- does that have to narrow as part of the final solution? >> i think so. capital gains going up 20%, some people suggest even more. that is something we should look at. there is concern about that. the differential is one of the reasons why will the americans pay so little. ann romney be one of them. it is not really fair. he thought it was -- mitt romney being one of the imperious -- to being one of them. >> on the other side of the leisure, they never released a math and with a scribbled all of the house -- on the other side of the ledger him, they never released a nafta and where they scribbled on of the ideas. we have had an election. shut those two ideas still be on the table the that the president -- should those two idea still be on the table when the president and the speaker are in the room together? >> it doesn't have to be done right now. it is not as much risk. we should deal with it and we should. whe
leisure time, save for retirement, and pay for education so they can grow up earning more than their parents. this. the weekend the american economy is not creating any jobs of any kind -- enough jobs of any kind. to many americans cannot have the skills they need. the path to a prosperous middle class is a combination of a vibrant economy that creates and positive role. federal policies on the national debt, taxes and regulations, allclass job creation. opening and growing a business. they are afraid of getting hit with a massive tax increase to pay off this debt. one of the leading causes of our growing future debt is the way medicare is currently designs for the future -- designed for the future. the sooner we act, the likelier we can do it without making any currently in the system, like paul ryan's and my mother. a complicated tax code is also hampering the creation of jobs. you cannot open a business if uncertain. that is allied i oppose the present's plans to raise taxes the -- that is why i oppose the dent in the debt. over half of the private sector workers and america
of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal s
an education or serve in our military. but i think we're going to be on that comprehensive. >> better than a 50% chance you have a comprehensive solution? >> i think. so i think there is going to be a subject of a lot of debate and discussion and we're going to need the scholars at the prom today and folks to help us think through this, do you take it as a series or comprehensive bill. >> i think it's hard to take an issue on which a lot of people agree and get action on it unless there's trust that some of the other issues that are maybe have less consensus have trust those issue also also get addressed. that's one of the reasons comprehensive immigration reform is attractive to ensure all the immigration issues get addressed at once. it's a reason that the senator's start up 2.0 bill is attractive is because it sees other issues. i want to pose another way that you could view the highly educated immigrant as part of a larger issue and that the non-instruction for our own students. what i see happening in many of the stitesths states and a greatly renude emphasis in why american students are n
. we're the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the work force, the 21st-century jobs. that is what we get from higher education to work force training, the real obstacle and the income growth right now is having the best education systems. where we are producing the workers of the 21st century. second, we keep the bridges open and hopefully functional and rebuilt. we represent environmental policies to keep our water clear and take on the environmental challenges that we're facing. it is where the rubber hits the road that we need to get the results. we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets understand that they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with a vision on education, on ensuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force for the jobs that aring with created, so we can be the job creators and we see incomes rise on our constituent. that is what voters judge you by. when we come out and talk to candidates we go for job creators, folks who are going to create jobs in this
security, improving education, particularly k-12 education, which the american public in this poll said is fundamentally important for a competitive nation and for the success of our next generation. they want solutions. they're very hopeful, but they want solutions. they want leaders to compromise. in this poll, as in all, a majority of both parties said their leadership should compromise with the opposition even if it means they accept the policies they do not agree with and if that means some policies around which they decided to vote for the presidential candidate of their choice. consistent with what everything we have been hearing and reading, they do rank debt and the deficit very highly as a priority for elected officials to get done, to compromise, and get to work. they also made it very clear what they have made clear in every one of our previous 14 polls, and they want the debate be connected to their real life and to things they needed to survive in the economy. the kitchen table discussion is important to them, so those priorities are poured to their mind, and they want goo
on the really important things that make a difference from job creation. we are the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the workforce of 21st century jobs. that is what democratic governors get. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they hav
people, educate them, maybe some good of good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, t
for college education as well. >> dealing with the mortgage interest deduction would hurt the middle class. >> if you take it in isolation. it depends how you balance it off. the rubric for us is, in has to be balanced. it has to be fair. it has to be comprehensive. it should be on the table to be discussed. we do not think that randomly you can pick things out, without understanding the unintended consequences that would provide. >> on the mortgage interest deduction -- i have a bill setting out there, trying to garner some republican support, that takes away the mortgage interest deduction for yachts that count as second homes. mr. larsen is talking about a schoolteacher trying to make sure it is affordable to buy a home, while there is a mortgage interest deduction available to people who buy yachts. that is coming from the person who represents the land of 10,000 lakes. i do not see a yacht in minnesota. that is the type of reform we are talking about. instead of signing on for that, they come to the middle class. that is where the frustration and fairness lies. >> we have heard from y
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national-security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need to
york and across the country. is the attitude about urban education and how many kids we are losing their are not graduating from schools. basically saying, we have an issue here we have to deal with. i try to discuss that with other mayors across the state and with the decision makers. we have to come up with solutions. it is a burden for a lot of cities, not just school taxes but property taxes and trying to balance the budget to provide the services needed. this are two major problems. this is a very old city. we have a lot of beautiful historic buildings. and in many ways when people do not take care of them, it is hard to keep them on the tax rolls or make sure people invest in them. basically, i have been through five governors in my 19 years as the mayor. i deal directly with the governors and the people in the senate and the assembly. we talk about the state capital which was tax -- 74% tax exempt. a lot of it was a result of the state taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state
address on the economy, jobs, and education policy. >> hello, everybody. over the last few weeks, there's been a lot of talk about deadlines we're facing on jobs and taxes and investments. but with so much noise and so many opinions flying around, it can be easy to lose sight of what this debate is really about. it's not about which political party comes out on top, or who wins or loses in washington. it's about making smart decisions that will have a real impact on your lives and the lives of americans all across the country. right now, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire at the end of the year. time is running out. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1st. a typical middle-class family of four would get a $2,200 tax hike. that would be bad for families, it would be bad for businesses, and it would drag down our entire economy. now, congress can avoid all this by passing a law that prevents a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. that means 98% of
the quality of life, education and continued development of those affected by what is a spectrum disorders and we must continue -- affected by autism spectrum disorders and we must continue to support them. there are many experts, individuals and groups who can help us in this effort. i want to take this moment to thank all of you for being here. as the chairman said, there are so many people interested in this issue, so many who wanted to speak. but i want to say to you what i said bob wright of autism speech earlier today. i think you for caring about somebody other than your children and ourselves. because what you're doing here today is raising this issue so that other children, other than those that may be in your own family, maybe your friends, will benefit in the future. you're touching the future and you're making it possible for those who are going through the optimism -- the hottest inspector disorders to have a better future. so -- the autism spectrin disorders to have a better future. so i urge you to stay the course. one thing i have learned in 17 years is that, in order for t
. it calls for the end of the chronic inequalities in our education system. it promotes economic growth from free enterprise because nothing has done more to lift people everywhere out of poverty. of all people i have ever known, jack kemp did more to personify and personalize this message. every problem does not to support -- disappear from the workings of the free market alone. i would love to say if we just went on the gold standard, it would all be settled. [laughter] americans are compassionate people. there is a consensus in this country about our obligations to the most vulnerable. those obligations are beyond dispute. the real debate is how best we can meet them. it is whether they are better met by private groups or government, voluntary action or government action. the truth is, there has to be a balance between the two. government must ask for the common good while leaving private groups free to do the work only they can do. there is a vast middle ground between the government and the individual. our families and our neighborhoods. the groups we joined and the places of worship. t
that only the truly informed, the truly educated, can somehow know what direction this country should take. i often thought the reason why warren thought that is because in combat, like john and others and bob dole and danny, they served next to ordinary people with 8th grade and high school educations. for me, all of the things that have been said about warren i could repeat and it would emphasize what you already know about them. the reason why i martin so much is the reason i just stated -- the reason why i admired him so much is the reason i just stated. i never met a man in all of the time i have served with the single exception of daniel inouye who had the grit -- in ordinary americans. the thing i like best from warren is when he said, just tell them the truth. that is what he always did. he told the truth. we all have a slightly different perspective, his honesty could be searing, but his compassion was always profound. that is a rare combination for any man or woman. he believed that the coolest lives are often told in silence. he would come up to you and say, i was flat wrong. le
we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national- security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. -- thanks robbie for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we
of the men and women who served in world war ii by caring for this memorial and by educating our visitors about the importance of world war ii in american history. as the proud son of world war ii veteran, i am honored to be entrusted with this care. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, sir. ladies and gentlemen, it is my honor to introduce the chairman of the board of the friends of the national world war ii memorial, lieutenant-general mckiliter. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us as it -- as we commemorate the 71st anniversary of the attack on pearl harbor and the beginning of world war ii. we want to welcome our distinguished guests today, admiral james winnefeld, our keynote speaker. we are also honored to have with us general px kelly, chairman of the american battle monuments commission who played a role in establishing this special monument. [applause] it is always good to have superintendent bill vogel, our cost for this to work together. also the director of the bell "honor flight" -- the film "honor flight." there are many other distinguished guests to give a
vulnerable and promotes self reliance. it calls for the end of the chronic inequalities in our education system. it promotes economic growth from free enterprise because nothing has done more to lift people everywhere out of poverty. of all people i have ever known, jack kemp did more to personify and personalize this message. every problem does not to support -- disappear from the workings of the free market alone. i would love to say if we just went on the gold standard, it would all be settled. americans are compassionate americans are compassionate people.
. years or 22 years old. i have spent of this entire year try to educate myself a lot more on the whole -- let me get right to the point. i think it should be a state decision. the supreme court should allow the states to make the kind of a decision. giving more people -- in giving more power to the government to regulate this on a national level will create so many issues down the road, and it probably a lot of issues in the immediate -- the reason we even got to this. is because we get some much power to the government to regulate all of the different things and issues. giving them more power is just going to create more problems. my basic thought is, more government power, more issues. host: we will leave it there. victor on the republican line. caller: i do not think the supreme court should even hear the case on gay marriage. our country was built on marriage. it is an abomination to rid it should not even be brought up again to the supreme court. host: why not let them handle it since courts have weighed in on a in california? caller: california is already full of abomination as i
' including closing the educational achievement gap. the lofty goals may have to wait as lawmakers and the president toppled a number of issues that cannot wait. let's go back to the inauguration from generic 20, 2009, a few hundred feet from where we are at as he addressed the nation. he will do so again january next year. this is what he said nearly four years ago. [video clip] >> we must dust ourselves off and begin the work of remaking america. [applause] everywhere we look, there is work to be done. the state of our economy calls for action bold and swift. we will react to lay a new foundation for growth. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what t
, gosh. i would lean towards jeb at this piont because he has really been pushing education. right now, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that are coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house was let's fix this problem by incorporating a small businesses and less government intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by
for religious sisters but it now educates a diverse group of students from around the world offering high quality educational opportunities that continue to reflect its catholic heritage. soon after its founding, laroche experienced financial difficulties that threatened the school's existence. due to the financial strain, the congregation at that time seriously considered permanently closing the college, however, because of the profound and positive impact this school has made on the community in such a short time, its donors at that time, the students, the state official, the community leaders urged the congregation and the school's leadership to continue the mission of the school and keep the school opened. thankfully due to the outpouring of support from the community, in 1970 the board amended its charter to establish laroche college as an independent co-educational catholic institution which it remains today. it also joined with the art institute of pittsburgh and diversified its course official, expanding the areas of study the college would offer, including graphic and interior de
alternative or try to empower the person where they are with education, food, health care, etc. i think it really depends on what kind of servitude we're talking about and where we are in the world. in the end, it could be an interesting line to draw. to say, when we're faced with a scenario that has to be separated or extracted, immediately because of the horrific pearl they are in, maybe we find a way of defining that as slavery. my fear is that there is always scenarios where you don't necessarily have to do that but it is the level of exploitation and sometimes that immediate extrax while necessary could cause more harm than good if done too quickly. i would not want to disqualify those as a result. it is have interesting. i could go on and on. >> you don't have to get up in the aisle, we could bring the mics to you. >> joe cook. i appreciate the value of an economic analysis but i can't help but feel it would be useful to help with an explain tory model. slaveries were symbols of consumption, they were for reproduction, they were entitled toward fair, they were used to sacrifices.
or to empower the person where they are with education, food, health care, etc.. what kind of such as to the we are talking about and where we are evident to of the world. whenever we are faced with a scenario where somebody has to be vacated or extracted a immediately because of the peril they are and, maybe we can find a way of defining them as slavery. there will always be some areas where he did not have to do that, but the a media extractions and while necessary can cause more harm than good. i would not want to disqualify people as a result. clause >> both historic fleet they are not used for labor exploitation, the worst symbols of conceptions and some sen. they wear used for sacrifices and so on and so forth. it seems to me and generalized model applauses happens at their heart will have a harder time dealing with things like forced marriage, slavery, war, and of the things. i do not mean it as a criticism as much as you can as a every fanged you want to say. question i think your point is well taken. i cannot agree more understanding the eve volition and the underpinning logic of most
. much like we want to have universal access to education. and we got to work hard every day to make certain of two things. one, it's good quality. and, two, it's affordable. and in fact i think it is fair for us to compare ourselves to other nations. we're talking primarily about the western industrialized nations where their delivery systems are much less expensive to deliver care and whereby the measures of things like infant mortality, obesity, other factors, diabetes, they have better outcomes than we do. so i think whatever it is you're delivering as a service, education or health care, we should always be self-critical to try to examine, are we doing it the right way, can we do it better, how can we make it work. but in the second thing, even if we say we don't want universal health care, somebody gets sick, most of the team they'll end up in a hospital and they'll get care. and the cost of that care is simply shifted onto everybody else who is paying insurance. like for instance if you have health care at work, about $1,100 of your premium goes to paying for uncompensated car
categories. access to education and the impediments i faced in my own life to education and how impossible it would have been for us to go to college if there weren't pell grants and student loans. it's the social realities and social changes that have occurred. you can't separate economic well-being from their social well-being. there are many young kids in america that are growing up in difficult circumstances raised by heroic parent, a grandmother in substandard housing, poor nutrition and schools that are failing. those kids are going to struggle. they don't go to after-school activities because the paints can't afford the fees. can you succeed? there are parents out there doing amazing things and will be the first ones to tell you, it is hard, but we can't be the country we need to be if we don't address that. government can have a role but civil society has a bigger role and we should support that and we have to address that and recognize it and talk about it. and maybe we haven't talked enough about that. i don't think that's the way to appeal to minority voters, that's the way to i
to be recruited for work across the country. his innovative approach to education led him to develop a block format curriculum that emphasizes a student-centered active learning environment, allowing students to participate in experiencal education from the very beginning of their studies and complete their doctor al degree in just three years instead of the traditional four. making roseman one of the most affordable pharmacy schools in the nation. during his tenure, dr. rosenburg helped transform roseman of a local school of 38 students to a regional institution with over 1,000 and offering an array of quality programs in nursing, dentistry and business administration. mr. heck: as he prepared for retirement, i commend dr. rosenburg for his vision, innovation and commitment to offering students an affordable, state-of-the-art education that has and will benefit the state of nevada and the nation. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from nevada yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >>
of the education committee, for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for three minutes. mr. roe: i thank the gentleman, the chairman, for yielding, and, mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 6582. this legislation would establish a uniform energy efficient descripter for all water heaters, walk-in freezers and walk-in coolers. the legislation also improves the testing methods that determine whether or not these products are energy efficient which will provide certainty for manufacturers and their products. in my hometown is one of the largest manufacturers who make up to 8,000 water heaters a day. and this is a real jobs issue in my hometown. these jobs have good retirement plans, health insurance and their competitors are both in canada and mexico and we need to do anything we can to help support these local manufacturers. this bill will make it easier for consumers to compare the energy efficiency of products and eliminate confusion that stems from having more than one type of label. the decision to invest in a large-scale appliance of this na
no leadership capable of making a deal. you cannot start with the education of little kids, teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for, and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. there are a lot of conditions for this to work. it cannot happen overnight. as i said, part of the problem is that have created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> express some realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. we'll be back essentially to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that? it is semi-democratic. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as to apply them, there will be certain -- circumstances were some send potential compromise is required, the new approach of these problems that way. if you have very good intelligence, you understand better what is going on within t
and political -- rights of political participation, boating, speech, access to education on an equal basis, are important to getting at some of the underlying problems that create the conditions that we heard in this morning's program. the legal realm is another area in which it is important in some context, you are bringing a case, whether in a domestic court or an international forum, related to cyber, you want to know -- you want to know the definition, but i think focusing on it too much distracts us from other potential things. finally, another area in which a lot of the debate revulsed is in the area of act as a critic in activism -- is in the area of activism. whether rhetorically exaggerating the definition of slavery or minimizing the definition of slavery -- in many ways, it is quite right amiss -- in many ways, it is quite reminiscent of the term genocide. just as the trans-atlantic slave trade farm the image of slavery, the holocaust is the image that comes to the average person's mind in relationship to the word genocide. darfur, sudan, the question arises, is it genocide? doe
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned united state, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national- security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need t
the availability of the resources to solve that problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars to help us getting this word out to america. i think that is essential, because it's coming on very, very fast. there are things that are happening we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines and sailors and soldiers and their equipment overseas without any burden to our economy. not true. the truth of the matter is it's a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national security policy that defends the country that we love so much. so i think without having the ability and the willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this, and you're there to help us in giving the americans the answers to some of the very difficult and very cogent questions which they ask. i want to take this opportunity to thank robby for what he does . i met robby some years ago when he found my bottom office in an office building and came in, and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he's t
contribution. >> let me ask you one specific question to educate myself as i report on this. your proposal you put forward, more revenue than the president, what about the actual trigger for some of the capping of those deductions, limiting those deductions? is it the $250,000 mark? >> we convert to an 18% credit rather than putting an overall cap on deductions, which governor romney had proposed in the campaign. and i tell you, the reason we did that, having considered it, and bill is one of the leading experts in the country on this question, if you limit deductions, it has a differential effect, particularly on charitable contributions, because for high income taxpayers, that cap on deductions will be eaten up by state and local income tax deductions and what you're doing is socking it to the charitable sector by putting a hard cap on deductions. we thought it was better to equalize the rate by going to a credit system. middle class and higher income people all get 18% deduction rather than a millionaire getting 35 cents on the dollar for a dollar of mortgage interest deduction versus a tea
, and even though you can quickly get to it, it was a two-year process. of educating not only the public but the members involved. i would argue that the interest groups embedded in tax expenditures are even stronger today. it is not just about the guys who want to go sailing or play golf. they have tv ads running, grass-roots operations out there. >> but there is one thing else. in 1986, there were no cellphones. they had to find a wired telephone to call, and by the time they had done that, it was already passed. >> this is very hard to do. as bill outlined earlier, you can see where the groups are lining up. the easiest thing they can bring about is gridlock and doing nothing. i am a firm believer if we go back to the committee system we can actually do more in having these kinds of general discussions, because as will marshall said, it will take a blend of policies, some rate changes, some base broadening, but let's see what the traffic will bear, but the political environment, the culture on the hill will accommodate. >> dave camp and sander levin cut a deal? >> begin the process an
, support literacy and education, improve community health and health systems and manage instability and threats in the north. and they had made significant gains in these areas. more than 5% across the past decade reducing the incidents of poverty from 56 to 44% by 2010. that was over a period of about ten years. it liberalized its serial markets, opened up trade routes and improved conditions fosh doing business. what we have seen is that agricultural production has increased particularly in areas where u.s. aid support has been active. as a result of the march 2012 coup in malli, u.s. government terminated assistance to the got. however, our support to address the emergency health nutrition and food needs of the people continue. in evaluating which programs can move forward in light of the applicable legal restrictions we consider whether they provide essential life saving assistance, whether they support children, frentsdzen food security or advance policy. we also consider operational issues including efficient management and oversight. this case by case analysis ensures careful
to education. we've got to work hard every day to make certain that it's good quality and that it's affordable. i think it is fair for us to compare ourselves to other nations. we are talking primarily about the western industrialized nations where their delivery systems are much less expensive to deliver care and whereby the measures of things like infant mortality, obesity, other factors, they have better outcomes than we do. whatever it is you are delivering as a service, education or health care, we should always try to examine are we doing it the right way and can we do it better. even if we say we don't want universal health care, if somebody gets sick, most of the time they end up in the hospital and they will get care. the cost of that care has simply shifted onto everyone else who is paying insurance. if you have health care at work, $1,100 of your premium goes to paying for uncompensated care, for people that short at the emergency room without coverage. host: on twitter -- guest: she's right in a way, because it's not a cliff. this is the design of speaker boehner and other republic
-higher education, infrastructure, they were liberal in their politics and progressive. they were deeply anti- segregationist and in jim crow. built in that area something called the research triangle that depended on education, higher education, and which has paid huge dividends and opened the road to the new south, as we think of it today. my father would have been coming in 2008, would have been so proud to see barack obama elected in north carolina, to see the state go for barack obama. sadly, it was not to happen again in 2012, although we worked hard at it. anyway, my first campaign that i actually was involved with was mcgovern in 1972. i think my wife kim has the bumper sticker that says "don't blame me, i'm from massachusetts." i think massachusetts was the only state to go for mcgovern, sadly. kim also took a year off between high-school and college and a ring doorbells and called people up for that at the field office in upstate new york. i worked with carol king and barbra streisand. we did a couple of concerts. it was 3/4 mcgovern as a time signature, me, and carol, and a barbara
at this point because he has been really pushing education and education is one of my things. so right now he's got me. host: that's stephen, independent. who did you vote for in 2008? i mean in 2012. it's 2012 now. caller: i voted for president obama and i really, really liked mitt romney. i thought he had a great personality but you know, why do i got to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? so that really bugged me. host: stephen an independent in connecticut. tyrone is a republican in the bronx. caller: hi, how you doing. host: i'm good. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate for 2016, i think she handled the middle eastern issue, libya, to the best of her ability and also as far as the g.o.p. is concerned, inshe's made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house as far as step up to the plit, pleths fix this problem by incorporating small businesses and less government inte
to be buying, including social security, including medicare, including investment in education, including investment in infrastructure, including investment in innovation to grow our economy which in turn will help our deficit situation as the economy grows. without raising any taxes. but the fact of the matter is i know the gentleman has historically not felt tax cuts should be paid for either by reducing it or offsetting. the president doesn't agree with the $800 billion because he doesn't think the math works. i share the president's view. the math doesn't work. the most useful effort will be if we all agree on the onive -- objective, whether it's $4 trillion, whether it's 70% debt to g.d.p. ratio which most economists or a little less than that is sustainable or is on a sustainable path. if we all agree with the objective and then, mr. majority leader, simply make the math work to get there on a way that we could agree on, i think america would be advantaged, the economy would be advantaged and we'd see a renaissance of job creation in this country as we did in the 2000's. and i'll be
on their having education and training. they also know the relationship between the security of the seniors in their family and the prospects of their future. if there is not that economic security and their parents have to be looking after their grandparents, that limits the possibilities. they recognize that. they have told us that. when it comes to seniors, and we talk about how we're going to affect medicare and social security, that takes place in the context of what has happened, insecurity about staying in their homes, the review of pensions. issues that relate to the age of medicare. it is not just about what we do here. it is about what is happening in the economy and how vulnerable they are at this time. people are viewing what we have here as almost irrelevant unless it really addresses their concerns. these are the concerns of the middle class. one family at a time can strengthen or weaken those families. it is really important that we recognize the role that each piece of this -- what are the revenues? what are the investments? what cuts should be made? how did they contribute
copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> tomorrow, join us for a forum on health education and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. speakers include white house national economic counsellor sperling and former congresswoman and burned mobile vice-president susan molinari. it starts 10:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. also tomorrow, a look at how u.s. debt, slow economic growth and the retirement of baby boomers could impact the global and economic future of the united states. from the american enterprise institute doug join us live at 5:30 p.m. eastern also here on c-span. >> we are at the new york state museum. this is our galley that is dedicated to the history of september 11 and the attacks at the world trade center. we decided with the gallery to tell the story for the first moments of the attacks using objects from the world trade center site. this is a piece of steel from the south tower. we put it in a place where the public can and should come and touch it. it gives it a real tangible experience. this is a piece of steel from the north towers. this is a dramatic
about reducing our deficit while still investing in things like education and research that are important to growing our economy -- and if we're serious about protecting middle-class families -- then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. after all, this was a central question in the election. a clear majority of americans -- democrats, republicans and independents -- agreed with a balanced approach that asks something from everyone, but a little more from those who can most afford it. it's the only way to put our economy on a sustainable path without asking even more from the middle class. and it's the only kind of plan i'm willing to sign. everyone agrees we need to bring down our deficit and strengthen our economy for the long-term. the question is whether we can do it in a responsible way that allows us to keep investing in the things that have always made america strong. i'm convinced we can. and if both sides are willing to compromise, i believe we can give businesses and famili
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